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Prof. Herbert Dingle
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Prof. Herbert Dingle (Books)

View count: 1
by Herbert Dingle

Pages: 256
Publisher: Martin, Brian and O'Keefe Ltd
Year: 1972
ISBN: 0856160601
ISBN: 978-0856160608

Websites: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Dingle

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Professor Dingle's reputation in the world of science, in Britain and further afield, is considerable, as have been his achievements. It is therefore a matter of fundamental importance that after much of a lifetime subscribing to what is regarded as a central part of modern physics "Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity" a scientist of Professor Dingle's wisdom and experience should now cast grave doubt on it, and ask for basic reconsideration. He writes: "The habit has developed of assuming that a physical theory is necessarily sound if its mathematics is impeccable: the question of whether there is anything in nature corresponding to that impeccable mathematics is not regarded as a question; it is taken for granted."

Professor Dingle's views have become widely known through a series of extraordinary, sometimes bitter, correspondences in Nature and the Listener. In the latter, much of the argument centred on the matter of the now famous 'travelling clocks'. His technical argument is reserved for the second part of this book. The first part will cause shock and dismay to many, whether scientists or not. In his attempts over recent years to raise the basic question of Special Relativity's rightness or otherwise, the author has found himself obstructed and progressively disregarded by key figures in the world of scientific responsibility and information. He gives chapter and verse to this, and the whole story is damning to a discipline that has claimed so much. Professor Dingle issues a grave warning against the perils that exist to us all as a result of this indifference and lessening of scientific honesty.


View count: 1
by Henri Louis Bergson, Herbert Dingle

Pages: 190
Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill (Library of Liberal Arts)
Year: 1965
ISBN: B001KYYFAG
ISBN: B001WQ6VT0

View count: 1
by Herbert Dingle

Pages: 280
Publisher: George Allen and Unwin
Year: 1961
ISBN: B000FSRQQI
ISBN: B0006DB2YE
ISBN: B000ZN9TC2

Websites: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Dingle

This book originated in the belief that there is an urgent need at the present time for a greater association between philosophers and scientists and of both with religious people. The problem of bringing this association into being is approached from different angles by the two authors, who, while agreeing on the main thesis, differ on many details, and the discussion is largely concerned with an examination of the points of difference. It ranges over the significance of scientific concepts, such as ether, energy, space and time, the place of mathematics in science and of linguistics in philosophy, the nature of scientific thought in relation to the universe as a whole, problems of life, mind, ethics and theology. It also raises questions of importance concerning the present attitudes of organizations dealing with these matters towards their respective concerns.

In the course of the discussion, Dingle described how a scientific paper critical of special relativity was rejected by various journals. Part of the paper is reproduced as Appendix II of the book, and is a very clear description of his "Proof that Einstein?s Special Theory cannot correspond with fact."


View count: 1
by Herbert Dingle

Pages: 92
Publisher: Methuen & Co Ltd
Year: 1940/1955/1959/1961
ISBN: B000GOEFME
ISBN: B0007GPZDY
ISBN: B0007J0M52
ISBN: B000LCDHSY
ISBN: B0000CKZE9

Websites: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Dingle

The Special Theory of Relativity is presented as a generalization from experiment, to the effect that there is no meaning in absolute motion. The distinctive feature of the book is the development of the familiar formulae of the theory from the single postulate regarding length.

The book was first published in 1940. By the time the fourth edition was about to be published in 1961, Dingle had come to believe that the theory was no longer tenable, and wrote as follows in the Preface to the 1961 Edition: "Since this book was written, reasons have appeared, which to me are conclusive, for believing that the theory is no longer tenable. Though this is not yet generally accepted, it has not been questioned that, so far as experimental evidence goes, an alternative theory is equally possible. This is quite a different situation from that existing previously, when the theory seemed the only possible interpretation of the facts of experiment. My first impulse was to withdraw the book from circulation, but on second thoughts it seemed more fitting to re-issue it with an explanation of the present position in relation to the presentation of the theory given here."

An Amusing Anecdote (http://www.hmc.edu/academicsclinicresearch/academicdepartments/physics/history/earliest.html?PHPSESSID=543550807dbc300c28f54a02a7a674f6)

It seems that it was Enos who came up with the idea of teaching special relativity to our freshmen and when he discussed this with Tom the two agreed that it was worth trying. In those days very few if any institutions included relativity in their introductory physics course, so finding an appropriate textbook for the course presented a problem. Tom thought he had solved that problem when he found in our library what seemed to be just the right book, ?The Theory of Special Relativity? by Herbert Dingle. Enough copies were ordered to take care of that year?s freshman class and the bold experiment seemed ready to start. When the books arrived, however, Tom discovered to his dismay that the publisher had sent Dingle?s latest edition, which was not at all like the one he had reviewed. It seems that Dingle had become convinced that Einstein?s theory was all wrong and thus had written an entirely different text in which he attacked the whole theory. By this time it was too late to find and order another text so Tom was forced to write up some notes of his own. Over the next couple of years those notes were not only used for the course but also were refined to the point where several publishers began pressing Tom to put them into print Tom signed with Allyn and Bacon in 1965 and in 1966 the book carne out That book, ?An Introduction to Special Relativity,? has stood the test of time and is still used at several colleges and universities, including HMC. When I visited Lewis and Clark College a number of years ago, I found that they were using Tom?s book for their relativity course, even though it was no longer in print, because, they said, ?We have never been able to find anything that even comes close to it.?

View count: 1
by Herbert Dingle

Pages: 72
Publisher: Methuen & Co.
Year: 1922
ISBN: 1408648504
ISBN: 978-1408648506
ISBN: 0548692823
ISBN: 978-0548692820
ISBN: B0006AITBQ

Websites: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Dingle

The aim of this book is to present the theory of relativity in the simplest possible language, without the use of mathematics. No previous knowledge of physics or astronomy is assumed on the part of the reader. The subject is treated in its relation to the general problem, which confronts all thoughtful persons, namely: What is the nature of the world in which we live? The view is maintained that relativity offers a simpler explanation of Nature than those to which we are accustomed, and that its apparent difficulty arises mainly from its originality.