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Dr. Carl A. Zapffe
local time: 2020-11-28 00:52 (-04:00 DST)
Dr. Carl A. Zapffe (Abstracts)
Titles Abstracts Details
  • Propagation of Light Through Outer Space - A New Model (1990) [Updated 9 years ago]

  • Laser Fiber-Ring Interferometric Gyroscopes and Einstein's Second Postulate (1988) [Updated 9 years ago]

    The Sagnac experiment and its successful application to yield a commercial laser fiber ring interferometric gyroscopic compass shows that the velocity of light c is fixed rerlative to geocentric coordinates or the magnesphere. Einstein's postulate that the velocity of light is c with respect to any observer is modified.

    Also published in:

    • Progress in Space-Time Physics, Paul Wesley (Editor), pp. 49-50 (1987).
    • Speculations in Science and Technology, V11, N3, p. 214 (1988).
    • Toth-Maatian Review, V1, N2, pp. 2907-2908 (1988).

  • The Star of Bethlehem (1988) [Updated 9 years ago]

  • Laser Fiber-Ring Interferometric Gyroscopes and Einstein's Second Postulate (1987) [Updated 3 years ago]

    The Sagnac experiment and its successful application to yield a commercial laser fiber ring inteferometric gyroscopic compass shows that the velocity of light c is fixed relative to geocentric coordinates or the magnetosphere. Einstein's postulate that the velocity of light is c with respect to any observer is modified.

    Also published in:

    • Progress in Space-Time Physics, Paul Wesley (Editor), pp. 49-50 (1987).
    • Speculations in Science and Technology, V11, N3, p. 214 (1988).
    • Toth-Maatian Review, V1, N2, pp. 2907-2908 (1988).

  • Cryptoexplosions, Brontides and Hydrothermodynamics (1986) [Updated 9 years ago]

  • An Epistemological Analysis of Einstein's Gravitational Gedankemexperiment From Standpoints of Hyperdimensional Geometry (1986) [Updated 3 years ago]

  • Monotheism: A 13-Point Precis on Religion (1986) [Updated 9 years ago]

  • Exodus of Einstein's Special Theory in Seven Simple Steps (1985) [Updated 3 years ago]

  • Exitus Acta Probat (1985) [Updated 9 years ago]

  • M-Space and G-Space (1985) [Updated 9 years ago]

  • Stellar Aberration from Standpoints of M-Space (1985) [Updated 9 years ago]
    • Critique by Wilczynski: V9, N1, pp. 4337-4347
    • Rebuttal by Zappfe: V9, N3, pp. 4565-4568
    • Comments by Milnes: V9, N3, pp. 4560-4572

  • Astronautic Interferometry as a Tool for Space Odometry and the Cosmographic Mapping of Magnetospherically Structured Space (1985) [Updated 9 years ago]

  • Anomalous Sonic Booms (1984) [Updated 9 years ago]

  • The Great Ice Ages and Legendary Floods (1984) [Updated 9 years ago]

  • Which Creationism? (1984) [Updated 9 years ago]

  • A Magnetosphere in Relativistic Physics (1982) [Updated 3 years ago]
    Published by the Institute of Theroetical Physics, Bignan Kutir, 4/1 Mohan Bagan Lane, Calcutta, 700 004

    This journal contains, obscurely enough, some of the leading papers in science of the 20th century, frequently and continually quoted in the Dissident scientific literature.


  • The Hafele-Keating Experiment (1980) [Updated 9 years ago]
    by Carl A. Zapffe   read the paper:

    This short note appears in Dr. Zapffe?s paperback book, A Reminder on E=mc?.  It discusses his reasons for rejecting the Hafele-Keating result.


  • The Michelson Centennial (1980) [Updated 9 years ago]
    by Carl A. Zapffe   read the paper:

    This unpublished letter, which appears in Dr. Zapffe?s book, A Reminder on E=mc?, was a rejected letter submitted to Physics Today, that took advantage of the occasion of the Michelson Centennial to propose an experiment to test his idea of a geocentric rest frame for electromagnetism. In this letter, Dr. Zapffe proposes the following: "However, we do have astronauts today, and space vehicles which should be capable of mounting a type of optical instrument for testing that exceedingly crucial point of (c+/-v) velocities. What an immense occasion if interferometer fringes should indeed develop as Michelson so fully expected.?


  • A Magnetospheric Ether-Drag Theory and the Reference Frames of Relativistic Physics (Discussion) (1980) [Updated 3 years ago]

    Aka "Replies to Comments on My Paper, " where "My Paper" refers to "A Magnetospheric Ether-Drag Theory and the Reference Frames of Relativistic Physics," Speculations in Science and Technology, V2, N4, pp. 439-459 (1979).


  • A Magnetospheric Ether-Drag Theory and the Reference Frames of Relativistic Physics (1979) [Updated 9 years ago]
    Online ISSN: 1573-9309. Past issues administered by Springer.

    From Thinking Out Loud, David Pacchioli, Research/Penn State, V14, N3 (Sep 1993) http://www.rps.psu.edu/sep93/thinking.html

    Speculations in Science and Technology was the brainchild of an American in Australia. William M. Honig, an electrical engineer, had left New York and a career in industry in 1972 to join the faculty of the Western Australia Institute of Technology, in "the beautiful remote city of Perth." Honig had published numerous papers in his field. He was frustrated, though, by the lack of acceptance of some of his more speculative ideas in physics, and by what he called "the canonical policy of established journals." He had met a number of colleagues of like mind and, in 1977, he decided to do something about it. He assembled an editorial board of well-known scientists, including a Nobel Prize winner and a member of the Royal Society, and with some financing from his university and the rest from his savings, launched a journal of his own.

    "Recognizing the value of frank speculation as preceding theoretical and experimental construction," announced the opening editorial, "and noting that the informal dissemination of ideas has been impeded by the huge growth and differentiation of all scientific fields . . . we welcome papers dealing with specialised, general, and interdisciplinary topics in the physical, mathematical, biological, medical, and engineering sciences. No topics related to ESP, UFO, etc., will be accepted."

    Some 2,500 letters poured in over the first five months. (One early correspondent, writer Arthur C. Clarke, found Speculations "fascinating, but 90 percent over my head." Clarke couldn't resist offering up a few casual speculations of his own: "Is it possible to photograph, or make an objective record of, 'phosphenes,' ? the fascinating and infinitely varied images seen when pressing on the closed eyes? This would be of great psychological and optical interest.") There were "favourable but cautionary" notices in Science and the New York Times, among other publications. By the end of the first year, Honig was able to strike a deal with the publisher Elsevier Sequoia, of Lausanne, Switzerland; despite changing hands and continents in the intervening 15 years, the journal has been appearing ever since.

    The wealth of topics it has considered is boggling. The journal's pages have hosted lively debate on ball lightning and schizophrenic cognition, black holes and the prediction of heart attacks, body transplants and interstellar communication, as well as the perennial exchanges on the nature of subatomic particles.