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Alan Montgomery
local time: 2017-11-18 10:31 (-04:00 DST)
Alan Montgomery Abstracts
Titles
  • The God Particle (2012) [Updated 5 years ago]
    by Alan Montgomery   read the paper:
  • A Determination and Analysis of Appropriate Values of the Speed of Light to Test the Setterfield Hypothesis (1994) [Updated 6 years ago]
    by Alan Montgomery   read the paper:
  • Is the Velocity of Light Constant in Time? (1993) [Updated 6 years ago]
    by Alan Montgomery, Lambert Dolphin   read the paper:

  • Abstracts Details
  • The God Particle (2012) [Updated 5 years ago]
    by Alan Montgomery   read the paper:

  • A Determination and Analysis of Appropriate Values of the Speed of Light to Test the Setterfield Hypothesis (1994) [Updated 6 years ago]
    by Alan Montgomery   read the paper:

    The velocity of light data from four different sources are tabulated and edited to provide data sensitive enough to distinguish between a decrease in c of the size claim by Setterfield and Norman and constancy. The analysis of these values yields a time dependent weighted regression model with significant fit and statistically significant trend. Data analyzed by time subintervals, distribution, accuracy and precision yielded results in support of the regression model. Attempts to determine an experimental or experimenter bias to account for this trend were unsuccessful. Some examples of physical evidence which might support Setterfield's hypothesis are discussed.

    Delivered at the Third International Conference on Creationism, Pittsburgh, Summer 1994


  • Is the Velocity of Light Constant in Time? (1993) [Updated 6 years ago]
    by Alan Montgomery, Lambert Dolphin   read the paper:

    The possibility that the velocity of light, c, is not a fixed constant is reconsidered by statistical analysis of the historical measurements collected from four sources. Our hypothesis testing of the selected data shows the measured value of the velocity of light to have decreased over the past 250 years. Furthermore, the probability of some systematic or experimental problem was found to be low. Brief analysis of constants other than c suggests that those constants which involve atomic phenomena and units of time are also apparently changing. A third set of constants with no obvious dependence on c were analyzed and show no apparent variability with time. A variable velocity of light implies that atomic clocks and dynamical clocks do not run in step -- that atomic time has been decreasing with respect to dynamical time.