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R. Steven Hall
local time: 2018-05-26 11:18 (-04:00 DST)
R. Steven Hall Abstracts
Titles
  • Electrostatic Transmission in Air (1996) [Updated 7 years ago]
  • Electrostatic Experiments (1996) [Updated 7 years ago]
  • Morphing the Electrostatic Generator for Flight . . . and Other Experiments (1995) [Updated 7 years ago]
  • Tesla Coil Electric Field Thrust Experiments (1992) [Updated 7 years ago]
  • The Electrokinetic Works of T. T. Brown (1991) [Updated 7 years ago]

  • Abstracts Details
  • Electrostatic Transmission in Air (1996) [Updated 7 years ago]

    R. Steven Hall, assisted by Charles Yost, performed a series of experiments that would allow the direct observations of electrostatic forces at work. These included the measurement of ion charge collection on an antenna.


  • Electrostatic Experiments (1996) [Updated 7 years ago]

    R. Steven Hall, assisted by Leslee Kulba, performed a series of experiments that would allow direct observations of electrostatic forces. These included levitations, spinning tops, inflation forces and the measurement of ion charge collection on an antenna.


  • Morphing the Electrostatic Generator for Flight . . . and Other Experiments (1995) [Updated 7 years ago]

    R. Steven Hall explains tests he and Charles Yost conducted with the Dynamic Systems, Inc. modified version of the Holtz/Wimshurst generator.


  • Tesla Coil Electric Field Thrust Experiments (1992) [Updated 7 years ago]

    A direct report of experiments conducted with a small Tesla coil reveal thrust and rotation effects. The cause is not determined, but such effects were briefly mentioned by Tesla in 1893.


  • The Electrokinetic Works of T. T. Brown (1991) [Updated 7 years ago]

    Thomas Townsend Brown was a physicist, inventor, and researcher whose work is largely unknown and hard to find because it does not fit easily into mainstream science. Brown invented the "gravitor," a device that demonstrated what was called the Biefeld-Brown effect. This effect is defined as "the observed tendency of a highly-charged electrical condenser to exhibit motion toward its positive pole." T. T. Brown was intensely interested in demonstrating electrogravitational phenomena. His lab notes testify to the constant and fundamental nature of his quest.