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Richard L. Hull
local time: 2017-08-20 02:01 (-04:00 DST)
Richard L. Hull Abstracts
Titles
  • An Interesting Phenomenon Associated with Lifter Operations (2007) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • Small Li-Po Battery Test to Determine Relative Power Delivery Rate to Weight Ratio at Different Loadings (2006) [Updated 7 months ago]
  • The Case of the Lifter: Efficiencies, Power Needs, Limitations, Prospects (2005) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • Tour of the High Energy Amateur Science Lab (2004) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • Neon Sign Transformers for the Researcher (2003) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • A Close Look at Charge Deposition from a Pulsed Tesla Coil System (2002) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • Fusors (1998) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • Electrostatics and Its Measurement (1997) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • Tesla Coils, Electric Gradients and Electrostatics (1996) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • Water Arc Explosions (1995) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • Reports from the 1994 New Energy Symposium (1994) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • Tesla Coils and Electrostatics (1993) [Updated 6 years ago]
  • Tesla Magnifier Basics (1993) [Updated 6 years ago]

  • Abstracts Details
  • An Interesting Phenomenon Associated with Lifter Operations (2007) [Updated 6 years ago]

    While casually investigating lifter materials outside of a formal experimental environment, some interesting observations were made regarding possible erosive flows of high-speed heavy ions. If one posited explanation for base ?skirt? material erosion is correct, the source of lift might be attributable to high-speed jet flow of heavy metal ions (throwaway mass) liberated by high field emissions from the top wire of the classic lifter.


  • Small Li-Po Battery Test to Determine Relative Power Delivery Rate to Weight Ratio at Different Loadings (2006) [Updated 7 months ago]

    A series of tests have been undertaken to determine the mean watt-minutes per gram capability for various loadings of a second generation, small 1320 mAh lithium-polymer battery. These tests were conducted to establish the viability of this power source for use in small lift vehicles and other devices where lightweight, short term, high-energy demand rates are needed.


  • The Case of the Lifter: Efficiencies, Power Needs, Limitations, Prospects (2005) [Updated 6 years ago]

    Lifter designers are having a lot of fun building bigger and fancier airframes. Richard Hull recommends some intentional steps to turn this technology into a useful tool for transport.


  • Tour of the High Energy Amateur Science Lab (2004) [Updated 6 years ago]

    Over the last 35 years, electronics systems engineer Richard Hull has done some serious tinkering with Tesla coils, electrostatic devices, water arc systems, nuclear fusion devices and many smaller projects in his home in Richmond, VA. This paper, based on hard-won successes with a few expensive false starts, offers tips to amateur scientists interested in assembling their own labs.


  • Neon Sign Transformers for the Researcher (2003) [Updated 6 years ago]

    The neon sign transformer is investigated to examine just what the nameplate rating means and how the researcher might intelligently select and use these low-cost sources of high voltage in their laboratory work.


  • A Close Look at Charge Deposition from a Pulsed Tesla Coil System (2002) [Updated 6 years ago]

    Results of a prior experiment and its conclusions are re-examined by two researchers. Charge deposition on isolated capacities due to rapid discharge of ?non-sparking? Tesla coils is tested a second time using a number of different techniques and instruments. This new, joint effort contradicts the prior work. Explanations are given as to why the prior conclusions were found to be in error.


  • Fusors (1998) [Updated 6 years ago]

    The Farnsworth/Hirsch fusor is a concentric spherical electrode accelerator which, with different included gases, different operating pressures, and various applied voltages and currents, can be used as a glow mode plasma sphere, a gas diode, an ion multipactor or even a means of producing neutrons. This article describes the fusor?s principles of operation, construction, uses and potential for further exploration by amateurs.


  • Electrostatics and Its Measurement (1997) [Updated 6 years ago]

    In this article, Hull gives a broad overview of electrostatics, its potential for producing forces, and what instruments might be desirable in a modest experimental lab for investigating electrostatic phenomena. He also questions the meaning of ?displacement currents.?


  • Tesla Coils, Electric Gradients and Electrostatics (1996) [Updated 6 years ago]

    Richard Hull reports the results of the latest experiments of the Tesla Coil Builders of Richmond (TCBOR). These experiments are directed toward studying the dynamic electrostatic fields generated by Tesla coils in an attempt to test Tesla?s claims that most of the effects of his coils were electrostatic, not electromagnetic in nature.


  • Water Arc Explosions (1995) [Updated 6 years ago]

    The interest in water arc explosions stems from the fact that the electrical energy input appears to be much too small to account for the energetic mechanical energy output caused by the arc, wherein a high velocity jet of plasma-vaporized water can punch holes in ?? thick plywood.

    The electrical input energy is hardly enough to increase the water temperature even a fraction of the amount required to produce steam; yet it will thrust a projectile at the speed of a bullet. We have one fascinating possibility that simple water might be electrically converted into an efficient thrusting mass for rocket propulsion. And, even more enticing, perhaps some excess energy is being produced by some form of atomic reaction.

    The real puzzles at this stage are just how much of the electrical energy is converted into mass momentum, and what are the most effective methods to test and measure the energy conversion. Peter Graneau and his associates have been investigating this phenomenon for 10 years, and now Richard Hull has joined this extremely capable team to help resolve the puzzle of testing and measuring the energy conversion efficiency.


  • Reports from the 1994 New Energy Symposium (1994) [Updated 6 years ago]

    The New Energy Symposium, held this past May in Denver, offered researchers and experimenters the chance to meet and network with men and women from all over the world who share the hope that someday soon a new source of energy will be discovered.


  • Tesla Coils and Electrostatics (1993) [Updated 6 years ago]

    This is an extraordinary report by Richard Hull. A Tesla coil RF output is shown to produce a high electrostatic charge on a distant insulated metallic object. The same charge accumulation phenomenon was found to occur on the distant object during the initial charging phase of the Van de Graaff generator. The experiments are carefully performed and well-documented.


  • Tesla Magnifier Basics (1993) [Updated 6 years ago]

    Tesla Coil Builders of Richmond (TCBOR) has been involved for more than five years with the design, construction and improvement of the classic two-coil Tesla system. Its members have rediscovered and improved upon many original ideas and methods introduced by Nikola Tesla in the late 1800s and early 1900s.